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Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
does this leave him? assume that he gets confirmed, he has to be a tough -- a tough guy at the pentagon. he is going to be tough with congress. he has to deal with the potential of the sequester, fighting for the budget that he does get, dealing with all of the problems that come at you when you are in charge of the pentagon and the generals and the other members of the joint chiefs are going to feel they can run over him. >> we'll see about that. i assume that every general with any number of stars was watching intently yesterday, and might have had that thought in mind. you said another important word, which is sequester. it's going to be a huge mess over there trying to, first, anticipate this, and then deal with whatever the new reality is. i do think that it was ugly yesterday. it was ugly on both sides. the white house wasn't so much from what i heard defending his performance as saying that those mean republicans also performed in an ugly and bad and not very attractive way. i don't think anybody looked particularly good in that showdown. i also think it's very clear that this is
move by the pentagon. >> the tip of the sphere infantry battalion, these are the ones that attack the enemy. these are all male for good reason. we don't have women in those units it's not a good idea to put them there. everyone is insisting and assuming the standards will be the same. they will be equal but they won't be the same. general dempsey said if the standard is too high and the women can't meet it, we'll ask, should it be so high, that's when the pressure to lower the standards will continue. he also asked for a critical mass of women. that will further lower the standards so we can have more women in the unit. and then we have a diversity commission that says, we're supposed to have diversity metrics, that's another name for quotas and promotions for men will be contingent on meeting the diversity quota. the military is not there just to support equal opportunity. it's there to defent the country and carry out the missions that are asked of them. >> one shouldn't assume every woman would be for this new policy, and most men would be against it, and some men would be aga
the latest move by the pentagon. >> the tip of the spear infantry battalions, the ones that attack the enemy, they are men for good reason. now, everyone is insisting and assuming the standards will be the same. they will be equal. but they won't be the same. because general dempsey said, well, if the standard is too high and the women can't meet it, we'll ask should it be so high. that's when the pressure to lower the standards will continue. he asked for a critical mass of women. that will further lower the standards so we can have more women in that unit. and we have a diversity commission that says we're supposed to have diversity metrics, another name for quotas. the military is not there just for equal opportunity. it's there to defend the country and to carry out the missions asked of them. >> okay. one shouldn't assume every woman would be for this new policy. of course most men would be against it. mikey, you're all for this. tell me about your experience in the military serving alongside women and why you're for it. >> don, i am. i think this is a very sensible, pragmatic decision
day everybody. . >> chris: i'm chris wallace. the pentagon lifts the ban on women in combat. ♪ >> chris: as the gender barrier falls, there are still questions. whether women should serve in the infantry and special operations. we'll hear from two retired officers. air force colonel martha mcsally, the first female u.s. combat pilot. and, army lieutenant general jerry boykin. then, with -- the hard part, dealing with gun violence to getting america back to work, is congress ready to act? we'll get the latest from two top senators: democrat dick durbin and republican bob corker. plus the president uses his inaugural address to push a liberal agenda. we'll ask our sunday panel how mr. obama is likely to do in his second term. and, our power player of the week: a student of the ways presidents exercise power. all, right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and hello, again, from fox news in washington. american women in the military have served on the front lines, for years. and 152 have been killed in iraq an afghanistan. but when defense secretary panetta lifted the ban o
control plane in the sky. they are talking to people at the pentagon, for example, so we've got a lot more people talking in real-time. so i think drone warfare is say safer, more effective form of warfare. less collateral damage and press blue on blue kills which is when we kill our own people. >> jon: what about a death star? >> i signed that petition. >> jon: did you really? why didn't you sign that petition? [ laughter ] when you think about it if you say it's sort of an easier technology, is that the kind of thing where -- you know, i always -- listen, i watch a lot of movies. anything like the clone armies, drones -- all those types of things. you see 30 years from now there may be robotic warfare where there are, you know killing fields of robots that are just kind of at each other. >> sure darfa. >> jon: who is that? >> defense -- >> jon: oh, yeah, yeah. >> yeah so they've got work going on right now to do that. i also think that there's a lot of work going on inside the military and outside the military to commercialize these but even to do humanitarian aid. i'm working with the n
rhetoric, or does north korea really have the capability to attack? pentagon correspondent barbara starr has all the details. >> reporter: north korea's latest sabre rattling. threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said it will lob missiles at the u.s. and conduct a new nuclear test, leaving no doubt leader kim jong-un isn't giving up his father's nuclear program. the u.s. might not is advanced warning of a new underground test. >> they have the capability, frankly, to conduct these tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing it. >> reporter: but there are signs they're ready to test if ordered. >> the north korean are maintaining a fairly high state of readiness at the test site. that means that if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> reporter: satellite imagery shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly. a bunker for personnel and equipment. and a communications network to make sure the order to detonate can be carried out. north korea's weapons
to be running the pentagon. >> sam? >> well, i slightly disagree with robert. >> i thought you might. >> you know, actually it's funny because some of these questions did produce interesting, illustrative answers. for instance, when ron johnson got hillary clinton to say what difference does it make? well, it does make a difference. the problem i found with the questions was they ended up stepping on the news. they became so demonstrative and so theatrical that they ended up stealing the spotlight from the answers. that did a disservice in some respects to the question. >> is the real story the feeder of the questions or hagel's fumbling performance? i think it's the latter. i think hagel had a dismal performance at that hearing. did he seem competent to run the pentagon? there were a lot of questions even among democrats after that hearing whether he's ready. >> i don't disagree with that. i think hagel had a really poor performance. what i'm saying is for these senators -- if you looked at what ted cruz was asking about, association with an israeli diplomat that basically 99.9% of the coun
and equipment will have to be ewessed and that will effect military readiness. the pentagon has began laying off 46 temporary and contracted workers. the full-time employees are also in the works. the pentagon is facing nearly $50 billion in cuts unless congress can agree on alternative. president obama violated the constitution. that's the decision from a federal appeals court. the ruling avoid the president's recess appointments of three national relations board members. recess appointments are when the president fills an administration position while the senate is not in session to avoid confirmation. the court says recess appointments can only be made between formal sessions of congress. the ruling also questions the nomination of richard cordray as head of the consumer financial protection bureau. the white house disagrees with that decision calling it, quote, unprecedented but no word on if it will appeal. she was found guilty of murdering her2-year-old daughter but found guilty of lying to -- i'm sorry, not guilty of murdering her daughter but guilty of lying to police. now casey anthony
, will be with the pentagon. it is only when the nation views itself as being at peace that diplomacy can take some kind of equal footing. until we get to place where we do something as dramatic as repealing or refusing to reauthorize, the authorization of the use of military force and we end our hot wars, when we have a transparent discussion about what our activities are in terms of drones and targeted killing, only at the point the nation decides to call itself at peace can diplomacy actually ascend to some kind of parity. unless and until we reach that moment, it is impossible, politically and institutionally to get there. >> at some point i want to talk about when they announce in the spring that the u.s. is going to transition to no longer being in the lead role in afghanistan when they make that announcement this spring. i want to talk to you about whether or not it's significant if they're going to rename the operation in afghanistan, whether operation enduring freedom. >> that's really interesting. >> that will be our next conversation. >> hopefully before then. >> okay. chris hayes, thanks. ch
including working at the n.s.c. on detail, at nato headquarters, brought at the middle east and the pentagon. he was advisor to four presidents, president obama asked him to lead his afghanistan-pakistan policy review in early 2009 and he did that for a couple of months before happily, for us, returning to brookings. bruce has written already two books in the time he's been here, actually a third is about to come out, i'll mention that in just a second, but the first two were about al qaeda and then about the u.s.-pakistan relationship "the deadly embrace." . his new book, coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon" and it's the story about the u.s.-india-pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point. spent 34 years in the u.s. army. retiring as a four-star general in the summer of 2010. he has been commander in afghanistan. he was the director of the joint staff. but perhaps in military circles, most of all, as i mentioned, this five-year period at joint special operations command makes him memorable
would be the first head of the pentagon who was a grunt, who was an enlisted man. this would be a very important gesture. there are enlisted men and women all owe over this country for whom this would be a big deal to have one of their own at the top. that has not been talked about nearly enough. >> we are going to leave it there and we will see, as you pointed out, how this unfolds over the next 24 to 48 hours to see if he makes it through. thank you, david corn and jonathan alter. >>> stay with us, much more ahead. but first, beyonce unplugged. ♪ brave, the brave >> thank you, guys, so much. any questions? ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm singing the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! >>> moments ago the debt ceiling compromise passed the senate. that's a fiscal crisis temporarily averted. it comes just a day after we learn that gdp, that's the mesh shush of how well our economy is performing, contracted by 0.1%. here is how some of the financial media
, the agencies, primarily the pentagon and the c.i.a. nominate people to be on the list. and it goes through what the white house promises is a very rigorous process of review to determine if those people should or should not be on the list. we don't know exactly what the standard is. but it involves a number of criteria, including whether the host country, the country in which this person, particular person is cooperative or not vis-À-vis capturing the person. in any event, they have a standard. names are nominated. it goes through an interagency process. and finally it makes it to the president. and he makes the final decision who is or is not on the list. does that sound like what you understand? >> i think that's certainly what the government has said happens. and, of course, this is the problem is that the only thing that we ever know about the counterintelligence stuff over the last 10 or 11 years has been, you know, what the government has been forced to say, what journalists have been able to find out, or what human rights organizations like ours have been able to find out on the ground.
. >>> keeping up with the changing times the pentagon will boost its cyber security staff. according to "washington post" another 4,000 people will be assigned to help counter increasing threats against government computer networks. officials say they intend to focus their efforts on networks outside the u.s. [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powerful relief of nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. zyrtec-d®. at the pharmacy counter. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we gi
, a new poll finds that the nation is strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement this week that women will now be able to serve in combat roles in the military. gallup report said 74% of people are in favor of the decision. those numbers hold up when you break them down by men and women as well. let me bring in democratic congress woman loretta sanchez, senior female member of the house armed services committee and homeland security committee. thank you so much for being here with us. why now is this time right time to do this? is it overdue would you say? is there something about it happening right now that's good timing? >> well, t.j., i've been fighting for about the last five or six years with a bill in the house to recognize what we already know. our women have been fighting in iraq and afghanistan. there is no frontline. everywhere is the frontline. they've been in combat. they've been killed. they're p.o.w.s. they've been wounded. and yet they have never received the recognition north pay nor the promotions due to the fact that they would be in combat. so it's long o
's terrible. in "the washington post," the number of people working on s cybersecurity for the pentagon is going to increase fivefold. the department of defense's cyber command which mainly focuses on kpourt systems is going to increase to nearly 5,000 troops and civilians. the retooled program will include combat mission forces who may help military commanders by disabling an encommand and control system before a military attack. tell us about it, richard. >> both cyber defense and cyber offense. you speak to anyone in the military in the intelligence community, this is the first thing they talk about. it's an area of great advantage for us. look at the way we use computer viruses. we can organize information in ways that others can't. on the other hand, everything we do as a society, everything we do as a military is now based upon cyber. so we're both the best but also the most vulnerable ultimately. so the idea that we're throwing enormous resources at this, this is no coincidence. it's not a one-time thing. this is now the future. >>> from our parade of papers, "the kansas city sta
the joint chiefs of staff. this was not imposed on them by any civilians in the pentagon or the white house. the joint chiefs recommended it because women are already in combat. let's start paying the ones who are in combat, what they deserve >> it is not like every woman in the military will be in combat. you've got to earn it. there's going to be tests. i mean come on, they're not just going to send people out there who aren't qualified. we don't have time to talk about hillary's testimony on the hill last week. just the floodgates of right wing misogyny that that opened up. preview of what's to come, i think. >> john: i think you're right eric. they had eight years of hating her as first lady. 12 years of loving her as a senator and secretary of state and now they're looking at 2016, they're going to hate her all over again to hurt her so chris christie, who they also hate, can become president. one more thing about the women in combat. there's so many men in the military who aren't fit for combat. there were so many women who are ready for combat and haven't been allowed to serve. i wan
in iraq was much worse than it appeared from from afar. i was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu mus
by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that controls the core infrastructure with our statutory irresponsibility to help protect the nation's infrastructure. when we talk about linking those things together from a security perspective, we are not talking about a regulatory overlaid. we're talking about how do you take part of our country that is -
-- september 1, 2001. there is smoke in the ground in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda @? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets of the provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogations program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. if you later -- if you sit recaptured a major player. he was a go-between. this was the key to all
military leaders the pentagon to cut from unsuccessful and outdated programs and put more money into the most successful and important programs. with that said, the only thing worse than the defense cuts and sequestration is no cuts at all. if we don't have the sequestration cuts at the top line revenue level went we will increase the debt ceiling with almost nothing to show for it. part of the reasons why the house republicans this week, extended the debt ceiling for three months to feel out paul ryan and his team to draft a budget that gets us balanced in 10 years but also protects the department of defense from further cuts because they have already been cut by $500 billion. >> do you get the idea, do you get the sense that americans are tired of world business. that doing some business here at home is gaining traction with people. are they world leadership weary? is the american hour ticking to a close? >> i think there is a degree of war weariness among the american people. it is not surprising. when your commander in chief is war weary you will be as well. when i was leadi
essential. i'm proud of the partnerships the state department has formed with the pentagon. america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remain in valuable partners in nearly everything we do. we've spent energy strengthening those bonds over the past four years. the un and world bank and nato are still essentials. all of our institutions and relationships check need to be modernized and complemented by new institutions and partnerships that are tailored for new challenges and model to the needs of a variable landscape. like how we elevated the g-20 during the financial crisis or created the climate and clean air coalition to fight short live pollutants like black carbon. or work with parties where we stood up the first global terrorism forum. we are working with organizations. consider the arab league in libya. even the lower mekong initiative that we created to help reintegrate burma into its neighborhood and try to work across national boundaries on whether dams should or should not be billult. ilt. world, people want to actually show up. a secretary state mig
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)